Physiologic Changes with Aging, and How You can Prevent Them

written by Johnny Nguyen

 

As we age, we naturally undergo many physiologic changes. The 3 changes that are relevant and significant to your health and function are:

1. Decreased muscle tissue

2. Changes at the location where nerves innervate muscles

3. Reduced oxidative capacity of muscle

 

The good news is that exercise slows the decay and even reverses the condition of these physiologic templates that support our long-term capacity to live a healthy and physically independent life.

Let’s briefly break them down…

Decreased Muscle Size and Contractibility

Decreased muscle tissue means that we lose body shape and the structural support that muscle provides our frame. And since muscle fibers carry contractile elements, we also lose the ability to produce sufficient forces to perform normal, daily functions.

Structural and Functional Changes Where Nerves Innervate Muscles

The junction where a nerve communicates with a muscle fiber is called a motor unit. As we age, we lose many of these motor units, leaving many muscle fibers “orphaned” and without nerve innervation. The remaining nerves, therefore, must share their innervation with orphaned muscle fibers through “collateral sprouting.” The result is that motor characteristics suffer greater variability — movement becomes shaky, less precise, and weakened.

Motor-unit changes are profound because they produce exponentially greater loss of strength than mere loss of muscle mass. Structural and functional changes in the motor units are worse news for us than mere loss of muscle tissue.

Reduced Oxidative Capacity in Skeletal Muscle

The loss of muscle and muscle function greatly reduces capillary numbers, lowering nutrient and oxygen influx and waste removal, thus compromising metabolism and the regulation of energy. Among many negative effects, this reduction leads to diminishing aerobic capacity, which is strongly associated with premature morbidity and all-cause mortality.

The good news is that this can be significantly reversed with exercise. Exercise training in older people can improve aerobic capacity by up to 125%.

But I believe in exercising, regardless of age, to create a physiologic headroom. It gives us a good functional and health reserve to age with, and a safe margin in case of unexpected illness or trauma — as those with high fitness levels also enjoy the greatest survival odds against endogenous shock and illness.

Exercise is, On Average, the True Fountain of Youth

Research shows that regular exercise of adequate intensity can reduce — or reverse — some of the most important physiologic effects of aging in the neuromuscular system. The key here is in the words “sufficient intensity.”

But I also believe that, given modern life’s restriction on time and all-day activity, the types of exercise (when we workout) become more important, because only certain kinds can facilitate the physiologic and metabolic load that he change a body that otherwise encounters too much sedentary time.

 

The Science & Why of Meditation

written by Holli McCormick
Reading time approximately 2-3 minutes 

Continued from What is Meditation?

“Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We’re left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don’t we think about training our minds?”

~ Sakyong Mipham
Turning the Mind into an Ally

Yesterday we discussed what meditation is not and what it is.  Today we will move on to the actual science behind the brain and then develop why meditation is a useful practice.

OUR PRESENT ENVIROMENT
In our culture, we tend to be on automatic pilot, going through the motions of the day – while there are tons of voices going off in our head daily, clouding our thoughts and making us unproductive.  While we do our daily life, our mind is either shut off or hyper aware of our past guilt and shame or busy planning for the future.  Therefore, we become reactive – versus proactive – to our present environment.

THE SCIENCE OF THE BRAIN
If you are living in a chronic state of reactiveness (i.e. on automatic pilot), you are most likely living in the part of the brain that is responsible for the “fight or flight” response.  This is an older part of the brain and is responsible for getting the adrenaline kicking and pumping throughout the blood.  Whether it is the actual hormones or the overload of thoughts from information/stress/business, there is a phenomenon called “flooding the brain”.  When the brain is flooded – you cannot think.  When you cannot think, you cannot formulate choices.  When you cannot formulate choices, you feel trapped or controlled by outside forces – causing your stress hormones to continue to go off in a viscous cyclical cycle.  There is evidence that remaining in this state can have long-term, chronic negative effects on the body.

On the other hand, when you learn to live proactively, you are able to stay in the frontal cortex of your brain.  The frontal cortex is the more evolved part of the brain where executive – or high level – thinking can happen.  This part of the brain allows you to formulate choices for any given decision that needs to be made.  When you have choices for decisions, you have more of a sense of control.  When you have more of a sense of control, your mind is calmer.  When your mind is calmer – your body, your breathing, your heart rate, your blood pressure and your hormones will follow.

WHY IS MEDITATION USEFUL/HELPFUL?
Meditation is a way to help tune your mind into your present environment – to learn to stay in the frontal cortex.  Training with meditation allows you to go from reactive to proactive in your life by learning to calm your mind.  When you train your brain, your entire body is benefiting – just like when you train your body, your mind benefits.  Therefore we can say when you train with meditation, you are reaping the physiological effects of exercise.  It is a two way street.

Like anything else, the benefits of meditation do not happen overnight; however, with practice – even with just 5-10 minutes a day – you can learn the art of focusing the mind.  When compared to physical training, meditation will help you implement clearer thinking in high stress times.  The outcome allows you to take that art of being present out into your everyday life, providing you with a sense of control.

 

What is Meditation?

Written by Holli McCormick
Reading time approximately 2-3 mins 

“Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We’re left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don’t we think about training our minds?”
~ Sakyong Mipham
Turning the Mind into an Ally 

Last week we here at Elementus hosted our first THRIVE: WELLNESS WORKSHOP event with P.E. for Your Mind: Introduction to Meditation. Our teacher for the evening was Fern LaRocca – a student of meditation for more than 30 years.  Fern’s gentle, non-judgmental, non-critical approach to sharing her practice with others helped us all fill at ease as we learned about this age old practice.  Here is the first glimpse of what we learned.  In the next post, couple of posts I will share the science behind meditation and then will outline some of the instructions Fern shared to help us formulate our training with meditation.

WHAT IS MEDITATION?
With all the buzz of yoga, spirituality and mental health these days – the word “meditation” itself can bring both good and bad thoughts to mind.  Many people have had opportunities to “practice” meditation – however due to a lack of guidance and/or instruction and the fact that meditation does not come naturally in our hyper-connected world – our attempts to try meditation might not have been fulfilling or seen as worthwhile.

Sometimes starting with what something is NOT is helpful in order to understand what it is:

  1. Meditation is NOT to necessarily relax.
  2. Meditation is NOT to make you feel all good and peaceful.
  3. Meditation is NOT an attempt to empty your mind or stop all your thoughts from happening.
  4. Meditation is NOT opening yourself up to the unknown that might be harmful for your spirit or your religion.
  5. Meditation does not have to be done for an hour+ a day to receive the benefits.

Now let me try to illuminate on what I picked up on what meditation actually is using the same number system to correlate to the above:

  1. Meditation is a PRACTICE of keeping the brain focused on the PRESENT moment.  We performed our practice sessions with eyes open, most of us sitting while also acknowledging the sounds from the street and parking lot outside – recognizing that our days are full of similar noises and distractions.
  2. Meditation is an attempt to take your feelings and honor them…not to make them into anything but what they are: feelings of how you are doing in this present moment.
  3. Meditation is an attempt to simply recognize your thoughts as thoughts: they are neither good nor bad, right nor wrong.
  4. Meditation is an attempt to tune into your own inner world with the goal of taking that mindfulness/”presentness” practice out into your real life experiences, giving you room to expand on your practices within your own spirituality or religion.
  5. Meditation, like the science has found with exercise, can be practiced in smaller, regular amounts with great benefits.

Continued with the Science and Why of Meditation

What are in your thoughts?

Are you tired of repeating the same behaviors over and over again, feeling as if you have no control over them?  Do you think you are entrapped in cycles that are unproductive and energy sapping?  Do you see yourself living a more abundant life yet are not sure how to get there?

A great place to start moving those behaviors to where you want them is to start tuning into your own thoughts.  Many times, we are on autopilot going about our day and do not realize that our behaviors are driven by our feelings…which in turn are driven by our thoughts.  You do not necessarily have control over your feelings – yet you do have power to control those thoughts that are driving the feelings.  You do have the power to capture your thoughts, analyze them and move them in a more positive direction.

The first step in tuning into your thoughts is often times starting with your feelings.  Working back from your feelings, then you can start to realize what thoughts you were having just prior to the feelings that came up for you.

For the next 7 days try writing down your feelings in the morning, at noon and at night and then writing down what drove that feeling.

If you want to join this challenge – follow this link.

What Juicer?

If you are anything like me, you stand at a store like Bed, Bath & Beyond in a daze at you look at the huge selection of different gadgets and products.  I want to get the best product without spending a fortune, one that does the job without the excess buttons, attachments, etc. I will not use or want

Well, here’s a review that will make your life a little easier ~ at least in regards to finding a juicer!

Happy juicing!

Electric Juicers (Juice Extractors) – Cooks Illustrated

Electric Juicers (Juice Extractors) – results